Most Governments world over are moving towards digitization of their operations. Online application makes it possible for visitors to get their Visa in advance hence removing the anxiety of whether one will be able will get it or not at the point of entry. There are three e-visa types for people traveling to the Republic of Kenya temporarily.

Single Entry visa- Issued for single entry to persons whose nationalities require a visa to enter Kenya either for business, tourism or medical reasons.

Transit visa– Issued to persons connecting through Kenya to other destinations for a period not exceeding 72 hours. Those connecting flights directly without leaving the airport dont need to apply for Transit visas.

Courtesy visa– Issued to Diplomatic, Official and Service passport holders coming into the country on official duties, or transiting through Kenya to a third country for official business or duties. It is also issued to government officials and dignitaries on official duties but holding ordinary passports. It is issued free of charge / gratis.

All foreign citizens wishing to travel to Kenya will need an evisa, except citizens from countries who are exempt. You may need to visit the Kenyan Embassy in your country to confirm status for your country.

The cost of visa is as follows; Single entry visa USD $51, Transit visa USD $21, Courtesy visa No Charge. The processing time for evisa is 2 business days. Once the evisa is approved, the evisa will be made available to your evisa account. You must print a copy to carry with your passport and bring it along when you travel to Kenya. When you arrive in Kenya, you must have your evisa print out with your passport.

The agents can apply on behalf of the applicant, as long as they provide accurate information by either attaching invitation letters or itinerary/bookings. Details of hotels and applicants telephone numbers are necessary for security and emergency purposes. The agent will use their own account (does not have to create different accounts) to apply with the details of the applicants. The Visa notification will be in the names and details of the applicant they will have applied for.

The East Africa Tourist visa is not affected by the new system. It is still available on arrival and covers Kenya, Rwanda and Uganda. It’s also possible to apply for this manually (in writing) via the High Commissioners Offices/ Kenyan embassy abroad.

An applicant will still be able to get a visa at the port of entry on arrival. Visas acquired at Kenyan Embassies and High Commissions are also valid and will be honored at the port of entry. Citizens of the following countries require a visa that cannot be obtained online or on arrival at the airport but instead this must be done in advance through a Kenyan Embassy: Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Cameroon, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Eritrea, Iraq, Kosovo, Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Palestine, Senegal, Somalia, Syria, Tajikistan.

Maasai Mara National Reserve

Maasai Mara is one of the world’s most magnificent game reserves. Bordering Tanzania, the Mara is the northern extension of the Serengeti and forms a wildlife corridor between the two countries. It’s named after the statuesque, red-cloaked Maasai people who live in the park and graze their animals here as they have done for centuries. In their language, Mara means “mottled”, perhaps a reference to the play of light and shadow from the acacia trees and cloud-studded skies on the vast grasslands.

The park is famous for the Great Migration when thousands of wildebeest, zebra, and Thomson’s gazelle travel to and from the Serengeti, from July through October. In the Mara River, throngs of hippos and crocodiles lurk. The park is also known for providing excellent predator sightings thanks to its relatively large populations of lion, cheetah, and leopard – especially in the dry months from December through February. Thanks to the parks altitude, the weather here is mild and gentle year round

Amboseli National Reserve

Crowned by Mount Kilimanjaro, Africa’s highest peak, Amboseli National Reserve is one of Kenya’s most popular tourist parks. The name “Amboseli” comes from a Maasai word meaning “salty dust”, an apt description for the park’s parched conditions. The reserve is one of the best places in Africa to view large herds of elephants up close. Other wildlife commonly spotted in the park includes big cats such as lion and cheetah as well as giraffe, impala, eland, waterbuck, gazelle, and more than 600 species of birds. Nature lovers can explore five different habitats here ranging from the dried-up bed of Lake Amboseli, wetlands with sulfur springs, savannah, and woodlands. Look for the local Maasai people who live in the area around the park.

Tsavo National Park

Kenya’s largest park, Tsavo, is sliced in two; Tsavo West and Tsavo East. Together these parks comprise four percent of the country’s total area and encompass rivers, waterfalls, savannah, volcanic hills, a massive lava-rock plateau, and an impressive diversity of wildlife. Midway between Nairobi and Mombasa, Tsavo East is famous for photo-worthy sightings of large elephant herds rolling and bathing in red dust. The palm-fringed Galana River twists through the park providing excellent game viewing and a lush counterpoint to the arid plains. Other highlights here include the Yatta Plateau, the world’s longest lava flow, Mudanda Rock, and the Lugard Falls, which spill into rapids and crocodile-filled pools.

Tsavo West is wetter and topographically more varied with some of the most beautiful scenery in the northern reaches of the park. Attractions here are Mzima Springs, a series of natural springs with large populations of hippos and crocodiles, Chaimu Crater, a great spot for spotting birds of prey, and Ngulia Rhino Sanctuary. Wildlife is not as easy to see in Tsavo West because of the denser vegetation, but the beautiful scenery more than compensates.

Samburu, Buffalo Springs, and Shaba National Reserves

On the banks of the palm-lined Ewaso Nyiro River, Samburu, Buffalo Springs, and Shaba Reserves lie in an arid region in the remote north of Kenya. Shaba National Reserve is one of two areas where George and Joy Adamson raised Elsa the lioness, made famous in the film “Born Free”. The wildlife in all three reserves depends on the waters of the river to survive, and many species are specially adapted to the parched conditions such as Grevy’s zebras, Somali ostriches, and gerenuks, the long-necked antelope that stand on two rear legs to reach the fresh shoots on upper tree limbs. A top attraction in Samburu National Reserve is the Sarara Singing Wells, local watering holes where Samburu warriors sing traditional songs while hauling water for their cattle to drink. Tourists here may also be rewarded with sightings of big cats and wild dogs.

Lake Nakuru National Park

Lake Nakuru National Park, in Central Kenya, is famous for its huge flocks of pink flamingoes. The birds throng on Lake Nakuru itself, one of the Rift Valley soda lakes that comprises almost a third of the park’s area. The park was established in 1961 and more than 450 species of birds have been recorded here as well as a rich diversity of other wildlife. Lions, leopards, warthogs, waterbucks, pythons, and white rhinos are just some of the animals visitors might see, and the landscapes range from sweeping grasslands bordering the lake to rocky cliffs and woodland.

Lamu

The small island of Lamu, northeast of Mombasa, oozes old world charm. A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Lamu Old Town is Kenya’s oldest continually inhabited settlement with origins dating back to the 12th century. Strolling the labyrinthine streets, visitors will see the island’s rich trading history reflected in the buildings. Architectural features from the Arab world, Europe, and India are evident, yet with a discernible Swahili technique. Intricately carved wooden doors, coral stone buildings, hidden courtyards, verandas, and rooftop patios are common features. Visiting here is like stepping back in time. Dhows plow the harbor, few if any motorized vehicles exist here, and donkeys still rule the streets as they have done for centuries.

Most of Lamu’s population is Muslim and both men and women dress in traditional attire. Top attractions on the island include Lamu Museum, with displays on Swahili culture and the region’s nautical history; Lamu Fort; and the Donkey Sanctuary. If all the history is a little too much, visitors can bask on one of the island’s white sand beaches or sip Arabic coffee in a local café.

Lake Naivasha

A haven for birders, Lake Naivasha lies at the highest point of the Great Rift Valley and has been known to shrink considerably in times of extreme drought. A flourishing floriculture industry in the area is also impacting water levels and quality. One of the best ways to view the wildlife is by boat. More than 400 species of birds have been spotted here, including African fish eagles. Hippos slosh in the water, and giraffes, zebra, buffalo, and eland graze around the edges of the lake. Keep a lookout for colobus monkeys in the canopies too.

Near Lake Naivasha, the Crater Lake Game Sanctuary features a wildlife-rich nature trail. Just south of Lake Naivasha, the relatively affordable Hell’s Gate National Park protects a wide variety of wildlife and offers excellent climbing opportunities with two extinct volcanoes and the red cliffs of Hell’s Gate Gorge. On the southern shore of Lake Naivasha, visitors can pop in for a cup of tea at the Elsamere Conservation Centre, the former home of the late Joy Adamson, author of “Born Free”, and her husband George.

Nairobi

Kenya’s capital and largest city, Nairobi, is legendary for its colorful colonial history. It was once the capital of British East Africa, luring settlers who came here to stake their fortune in the coffee and tea industries. Today, tourists can explore the city’s famous historic sites as well as some excellent wildlife-related attractions. The Nairobi National Museum is a great one-stop spot to see exhibits on Kenya’s history, nature, culture, and contemporary art. Green thumbs will also enjoy the botanic gardens on the grounds. Another popular tourist attraction is the Karen Blixen Museum, the restored residence of the famous Danish author of the book, “Out of Africa”, also known by her pen name, Isak Dinesen.

To see wildlife without venturing far from the city center, visit Nairobi National Park, now a black rhino sanctuary and also home to a host of other classic safari stars including lions, leopards, buffalo, zebras, wildebeest, and cheetahs. Within the park’s borders, the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust offers close-up encounters with elephant orphans. And no visit to Nairobi would be complete without popping into the Giraffe Centre near the famous Giraffe Manor where these long-necked beauties eat out of visitors’ hands. While visiting Nairobi, travelers should exercise care as crime rates have escalated in recent years.

Mombasa

Kenya’s second largest city and biggest port, Mombasa is a multicultural tourist magnet. British, Portuguese, Arab, Indian, and Asian immigrants add to the rich cultural mix and their influence is evident in the architecture as well as the many different types of cuisine. Mombasa is actually an island connected to its mushrooming development on the mainland by a causeway, bridges, and ferries. Coral reefs fringe the coast for 480 km providing fantastic snorkeling and diving opportunities, especially at Mombasa Marine National Park and around Wasini Island Dolphin watching and deep-sea fishing are also popular.

History buffs will enjoy exploring the 16th-century Fort Jesus and Old Town with its narrow streets, ancient Swahili dwellings, markets, and souvenir shops. The north shore of Mombasa is crammed with attractions including Mombasa Go-Kart, cinemas, sports, and a cornucopia of restaurants. This being a coastal hub, beach lovers will find some worthy strands nearby. North of the city, Nyali and Bamburi Beaches are favorites, while the white strands of Shelly, Tiwi, and Diani Beaches are popular spots south of Mombasa.

Malindi

North of Mombasa on the Kenyan coast, Malindi is a beach resort popular with European visitors. Thanks to its rich trading history, it too is a melting pot of cultures and cuisines, and also sports a split personality. Part historic old town, part modern tourist hub, Malindi is where travelers come to sun on the white sands of Watamu Beach, dive the coral reefs of the Malindi and Watamu Marine National Parks, and soak up a dose of Swahili history in the historic town, dating from the 12th century. Here tourists can visit the Jami Mosque, two pillar tombs from the 14th century, and the Church of St Francis Xavier, one of East Africa’s oldest churches. On the promontory, the Vasco De Gama Cross is one of the oldest standing monuments in Africa. In the former home of an Indian trader, the Malindi Museum has displays on Vasco de Gama and also doubles as an information center.

Mount Kenya National Park

In the Central Highlands, east of the Great Rift Valley, Mount Kenya National Park is a UNESCO World Heritage Site encompassing the country’s namesake highest mountain at 5,199 m and providing the rare sight of equatorial snow. Formed by a series of volcanic eruptions, Mount Kenya is actually comprised of three glacier-cloaked peaks. The highest is Batian, although Nelion, the next highest, is a tougher climb. The lowest peak, Lenana, is considered the easiest climb, although unpredictable weather can pose challenges.

Scenery varies from glaciers, lakes, and mineral springs to alpine forest and dense pockets of bamboo. The diversity of flora and fauna provides rewarding opportunities for safaris. Among the wildlife here visitors may spot black and white colobus monkeys, buffalo, elephant, tree hyrax, leopard, and hyena. Nestled in the foothills, the famous Mount Kenya Safari Club is a luxury retreat with trout fishing, golf, and tennis.

Hell’s Gate National Park

A hotspot for climbers, Hell’s Gate National Park is one of the few parks in Kenya that allows rock climbing and enables visitors to explore on foot or bicycle. Hell’s Gate offers excellent climbing and hiking opportunities with two extinct volcanoes, the red cliffs of Hell’s Gate Gorge, Obsidian Caves, and the pointed column of rock known as Fischer’s Tower, a former volcanic plug. Geothermal features include hot springs and natural geysers hissing steam through vents in the earth’s crust. The park also protects a wide variety of wildlife including leopards, baboons, hartebeest, eland, ostriches, gazelles, and more than 100 species of birds as well as eagle and vulture breeding grounds.

Olkaria Geothermal Station, the first of its kind in Africa, lies within Hell’s Gate National Park and generates power from heated, pressurized water underground. The Oloor Karia Maasai Cultural Centre within the park is worth a visit with Maasai singing, dancing, and jewelry-making demonstrations.

The Kenyan climate is perfect for your year-round bush and beach holiday. The moderate to equatorial temperatures mean that you are comfortable during your daytime game drives and other outdoor activities. In the evenings and early mornings, you may only need a light jacket or warm fleece to fend off the slightly cooler temperatures in the Great Rift Valley highlands. Temperatures and rainfall levels fluctuate throughout the year.

July to October is the longest dry season of the year in Kenya which is also the cooler period for the first couple of months. You can expect to see higher densities and diversity of wildlife during this time. The reason is that the absence or minimal precipitation means that last remaining temporary water sources evaporate or recedes, so animals have fewer sites to drink, and congregate at permanent water sources.

Visitor levels are highest during the long dry season because it is considered the optimum and the best time for wildlife viewing, it is the most expensive season to travel too. Additionally, the time of year coincides with the long summer school break in Europe, America and elsewhere. Lastly, another advantage of the long dry season is that you generally experience fewer insects and mosquitoes than other times of the year due to the abundant lack of stagnant waters.

Kenya’s long dry season is followed by a short rainy season in November and December. The rains do increase the amount of vegetation in the wilderness, so the animals are more dispersed due to the availability of more pasture grounds and may take more tracking time to view them. In general, visitor levels decline slightly during the short rainy season, with the exception of Christmas and New Year’s. The rates reduce during this period but peaks again in the last week of December through the New Year.

The lesser precipitation evaporates quickly in Kenya, so road conditions are not that affected. Your ground transportation and game drives are not impacted. Cold wintry conditions in Europe and the United States correspond with the short humidly hot-dry season of January and February. The need to escape cold weather brings an influx of visitors to Kenya’s many natural, historical and cultural treasures in the national parks and the eastern seashores.

April to June brings the long rainy season. Road conditions may be impacted, but we consider this time of year to be when the flora in Kenya are exceptionally enchanting. The abundance of vegetation and water sources means that herbivore animals are less concentrated due to greater availability of pasture and water. Grasses are also long, so predators are challenging to track and spot, and require more time in the bush. But the magic of the long rainy season is that it coincides with the calving season of some mammals, especially antelopes. Withstanding the drawbacks of the rains gives you a front row seat to watching the birth, the first interaction between mother and baby and first steps. You also watch in anticipation as a newborn learns to nestle within the vegetation to avoid the attention of the many watchful predators on the plains. The long rain season is the cheapest period to travel to Kenya, though, that visitor levels do increase slightly during the Easter holiday week.

Kenya offers the traveller a wide range of accommodation options. From youth hostels to five star luxury suites, from pitching your own tent in the wilderness to relaxing in a private beachside villa, the availability is endless.

Your choice of accommodation for your stay in Kenya should be dictated by your personal travel budget, but also by your own interests. For some people, sleeping under canvas tent in the Kenyan bush, by an open fire and surrounded by the spectacular night noises of wild animals, is a once in a life time experience that has greater value than the most costly hotel or lodge.

For others, the experience of enjoying unparalleled luxury, fine cuisine and world class service while surrounded by the wonders of the wild makes Kenya the ultimate destination. Whether you’re looking to rough it or relax in style, Kenya can cater for every taste, budget and personal interest.

Camping (temporary tent) – A camping safari in Kenya is one of the world’s great travel adventures. Pitching your tent in the bush gives you the feeling of really living in the wild. The romance of an open campfire under a magnificent sky full of stars is undeniable, and night in the wild is a magical time, when the air rings with the whooping calls of hyenas and the dawn is heralded by the unforgettable sound of a lions roar.

This is truly a great adventure, and most of Kenya’s Game Reserves and National Parks have campgrounds and some basic facilities. Clear tent space and long drop latrines are often available. In some campsites, water and rudimentary shelters are also provided. Many safari operators offer camping safaris through one or more of the Parks and Reserves. Vehicles, guides, tents and equipment, as well as food and a cook are all provided.

Campers should take care of wildlife. Do not leave fruit or other food inside tents, it can attract monkeys, baboons, and even in some areas elephants, resulting in destruction of tents and equipment.

Tented Camps (permanent tent) – For those looking for the camping experience without the possible discomfort, then a Tented Camp is an ideal option. Tented Camps provide the visitor with large walk in tents, complete with beds and furniture. The tent often has its own private bathroom with supplied water, showers and flush toilets.

In some cases these camps are established on a mobile basis and fully stocked and equipped by a safari company. In other permanent tented camps, tents are on large raised wooden platforms with private balconies and excellent views.

Most Tented camps have a central mess tent, or a fully stocked restaurant and bar. Levels of luxury in tented camps vary from the functional through to five star, with tents offering the standard of accommodation one would expect from a top end international resort. Tented camps can be found in many of Kenya’s National Parks and Reserves, as well as on private game ranches and sanctuaries.

Lodges– Safari lodges in Kenya offer hotel-style comforts and accommodation in the wilderness. Standards vary from the rustic to the modern, from the simply appointed to the last word in luxury. Efforts is usually made to design lodges that blend into their environment, with an emphasis on all natural local building materials and use of traditional art and decoration.

Most lodges serve meals and have lounges and bars, often with excellent views or overlooking waterholes or salt licks that attract game. Many have resident naturalists, as well as guides for organized walks or game drives. Lodges are found throughout Kenya’s National Parks and Reserves and other wilderness areas.

Hotels– Kenya has a great variety of hotel accommodation to suit all budgets and tastes. For backpackers and those looking for cheap lodgings, Most towns have youth hostel and many budget hotels. Almost every town in the country offers basic budget hotels and lodgings. In many tourist areas, private campsites and small hotels offer budget rates for backpackers.

Nairobi has an excellent range of hotels, including many well-appointed hotels of international standards with full facilities for tourists and business travelers. Other Cities and large towns all have a good range of hotel accommodation. Small boutique hotels are also becoming increasingly popular, in Nairobi, on the Coast, and in Wilderness areas.

Rental Homes, Apartments and Cottages– Throughout Kenya, it is possible to find excellent rental properties for short or long term lets. These vary from rustic cottages in the bush to historic Swahili Mansions on the coast, from serviced city apartments to houses fronted by beautiful deserted beaches.

Renting a private property is a good way to gain a new perspective on Kenya and to get away from lodges, camps and hotels and relax on your own. Most rental properties come fully equipped, and often staff and a cook are provided to help out with meals and cleaning. Such properties can either be booked privately or through a travel agent or safari operator.

Homestays – Homestays are an ideal way to experience Kenyan life. In some areas, homestays with Kenyan families can be arranged that allow visitors to spend time in a local home and to discover the way of life in a typical Kenyan household.

This kind of ‘cultural exchange’ tourism is popular with visiting student groups, volunteers and those with an interest in Kenyan culture. At the other end of the spectrum, Luxury homestays on Private Game Ranches, Sanctuaries and Farms are also possible. These beautiful homes let the visitor enjoy Kenya in total luxury and privacy, with their own timetables and interests catered for by skilled and knowledgeable local guides.

The real advantage of a Kenyan homestay is the opportunity to spend time with Kenyans and their families, and to share the benefit of their many years of local experience and intimate knowledge of the country, its people and wildlife.

Lying on the east coast of Africa, shaped like a harp, the Republic of Kenya is a beautiful country with diverse topography. This varied topography divided by the equator contributes to an equally diverse climate since it includes warm coastal locales, temperate grassy plains, cooler highlands, tropical riverine forests and hot, arid desert regions. You will also find snow-capped peaks here where the temperatures hover around sub-zero figures.

Covering an area of around 224,962 square miles (582,650 square kilometers), it sits on the equator and shares borders with five other African countries – Tanzania, Uganda, Ethiopia, Sudan and Somalia.
Kenya has an interesting amalgamation of cultures thanks to the centuries of migrants that arrived here and made it home. Every one of these people brought something new to the present day country, and Kenya’s culture that you see today has elements of all. They also brought along their cooking styles and thus Kenyan cuisine is an eclectic combination of all elements. You will find European, African, Arabic, Indian and Asian food including delicacies from Japan and China.

Or you could try the formidable meat roasts at the various choma joints of Kenya, the most famous among them being the Carnivore in Nairobi. These joints serve Nyama Choma that means grilled meat. Generous slabs of meat are chargrilled slowly on large, open, charcoal fires that lend a special earthy flavor to them. Relish them with accompaniments of ugali, a stiff porridge made of maize flour and sukuma wiki, a mixed green vegetables dish, a traditional meal that you must absolutely try on your tour in Kenya. Of course, if you are traveling in the many parks and reserves in Kenya, you could try the al fresco dining experience at your bush camp or lodge augmented by its varied culinary delights.

You will find more than 40 various tribes here, among them the Maasai, Samburu, Turkana, Kikuyu, Luo, Luhya, Kalenjin, Kamba, Meru, Kisii and many others, each having their linguistic trends. However, the most common voice that is also the national tongue is the Kiswahili language which is an eclectic combination of Bantu and Arabic with a tinge of Persian and also English knockoff words in the industrialized times e.g. busi for bus, koti as coat, baiskeli as bicycle etc. Kenya uses English as its official language.

Besides agriculture, tourism plays a vital part in contributing to Kenya’s international currency reserves and the creation of local jobs. Tourism employs a large population of Kenyans both directly and indirectly.

 

Kenya Day Excursions

Ngong Forest Sanctuary Walk Ngong Forest Sanctuary is 600 Hectares of Urban Forest offering bird watching and tree walks Ngong Hills Hiking The Ngong Forest Reserve located 25 Kilometers South West of Nairobi. It’s a popular walking and picnicking venue for Nairobi's residents and visitors. The walk/ Hike takes about 4 to 5 hour to complete, depending on fitness levels. Nairobi City Tour This includes a walking Safari in Nairobi central business district where you have ample time for close photography. You will visit a local market where you can bargain and shop for arts and crafts etc, visit Parliament buildings, Kenyatta International Conference Centre. A tour to the top of Kenyatta International Conference (Government Building with 28 stories) to look at Nairobi skyline can be arranged. Nairobi Maasai Market Nairobi Cultural Tour with shopping takes us to Utamaduni Arts and Crafts; located in the peaceful Nairobi suburb of Langata. Utamaduni is housed in a former homestead with an acre of lush gardens. There are over 30 stalls selling good quality art and craft, jewelry, paintings etc. We also get to visit the African Heritage Gallery, located at the Carnivore grounds and also Kazuri Beads Cottage industry. Another option leads shopping at Masai Market in Nairobi

Nairobi Day Trip Hiking

Duration: 1 day Country: Kenya Departures: Nairobi
Mount Longonot Day Trip

Mount Longonot Day Trip

Duration: 1 day Country: Kenya Departures: Nairobi
Lake Naivasha Day Trip

Lake Naivasha Day Trip

Duration: 1 day Country: Kenya Departures: Nairobi
Ol Pejeta/Sweetwaters Conservancy Day Trip Safari from Nairobi is only a three hour drive from Nairobi on good roads, Ol Pejeta conservancy is the closest place for someone in Nairobi to come and see the big five. It boasts an astounding variety of animals including the non-indigenous chimpanzees and the big 5 (the endangered black rhino, leopard, elephant, buffalo and lion).

Ol Pejeta/Sweetwater Conservancy Day Trip

Duration: 1 day Country: Kenya Departures: Nairobi

Nairobi Wildlife Day Trip

Duration: 1 day Country: Kenya Departures: Nairobi
Hells Gate National Park Day Trip

Hells Gate National Park Day Trip

Duration: 1 day Country: Kenya Departures: Nairobi
Amboseli National Park Day Trip

Amboseli National Park Day Trip

Duration: 1 day Country: Kenya Departures: Nairobi
Lake Nakuru National Park Day Trip

Lake Nakuru National Park Day Trip

Duration: 1 day Country: Kenya Departures: Nairobi
Giraffe Center/ Daphne Sheldrick/ Karen Blixen Day Trip

Giraffe Center/ Daphne Sheldrick/ Karen Blixen Day Trip

Duration: 1 day Country: Kenya Departures: Nairobi
Nairobi National Park / Carnivore Restaurant/ Bomas Of Kenya

Nairobi National Park / Carnivore Restaurant/ Bomas Of Kenya

Duration: 1 day Country: Kenya Departures: Nairobi

Kenya One Night Gate Aways

One Night Sweetwaters Sanctuary

One Night Sweetwaters Sanctuary

Duration: 2 days Country: Kenya Departures: Nairobi
One Night Shimba Hills National Park

One Night Shimba Hills National Park

Duration: 2 days Country: Kenya Departures: Mombasa
One Night Lake Baringo

One Night Lake Baringo

Duration: 2 days Country: Kenya Departures: Nairobi
One Night Amboseli National Park

One Night Amboseli National Park

Day 1: Nairobi to Amboseli National Park
One Night Naivasha

One Night Naivasha

Duration: 2 days Country: Kenya Departures: Nairobi

Kenya Two Nights Gate Aways

Two Nights Sweet Waters Sanctuary

Two Nights Sweet Waters Sanctuary

Duration: 3 days Country: Kenya Departures: Nairobi
Two Nights Masai Mara National Reserve

Two Nights Masai Mara National Reserve

Duration: 3 days Country: Kenya Departures: Nairobi

Kenya Three & Four Nights Gate Aways

East_ Nine Nights Kenya - Uganda - Tanzania

4 Nights Masai Mara - Lake Nakuru - Amboseli

Duration: 5 days Country: Kenya Departures: Nairobi
4 Nights- Aberdare- Samburu - Lake Nakuru - Masai Mara Safari

4 Nights- Aberdare- Samburu - Lake Nakuru - Masai Mara Safari

Duration: 5 days Country: Kenya Departures: Nairobi
4 Nights Maasai Mara - Naivasha – Nakuru, Kenya

4 Nights Maasai Mara - Naivasha – Nakuru, Kenya

Duration: 5 days Country: Kenya Departures: Nairobi
4 Nights Mt. Kenya- Sweet Waters- Samburu National Reserve

4 Nights Mt. Kenya- Sweet Waters- Samburu National Reserve

Duration: 5 days Country: Kenya Departures: Nairobi
3 Nights Amboseli- Tsavo West

3 Nights Amboseli- Tsavo West

Duration: 4 days Country: Kenya Departures: Nairobi/

Kenya Five to Eight Nights Safari

8 Nights Kenya Wilderness Safari

Duration: 9 days Country: Kenya Departures: Nairobi
6 Nights Kenya Wildlife And Beach Safari

6 Nights Kenya Wildlife And Beach Safari

Duration: 7 days Country: Kenya Departures: Nairobi
5 Nights Central, Rift Valley And Southern Kenya Safari

5 Nights Central, Rift Valley and Southern Kenya Safari

Duration: 6 days Country: Kenya Departures: Nairobi